Thursday, February 15, 2007

Now for finishing up. Pull the remaining cords to tighten up the last knot and closely trim off one side of the excess cord.

Use the lighter to melt the end you just cut. I wait a couple of seconds then use my thumb to press the melted end so that it securely attaches to the surrounding cord. *Be very careful, you can get a nasty burn from the melted cord. You may use a the scissors or a knife to flatten out the melted end if you want to be on the safe side. Just make sure it's a good melt so it holds like a weld. You can now tighten up the other extra end and cut/melt and press it to finish up.

If you get a good melt it'll hold up under everyday use. If you want to untie the lanyard to use the cord, you can break the weld by hard twisting or use a pen to push it from the opposite side to break it. If you just want to avoid using a flame, you might try using a soldering iron or wood burning tool, or even a weatherproof/waterproof glue can be used instead. Or tie an overhand knot and work it close up to the last knot and then trim the excess. It won't look as neat, but it'll hold.

And another finishing option is to tuck the ends into/under the last couple of knots. You can use a pair of hemostats to pull the cord ends(one at a time as it's a tight fit) up under the knots, then trim any excess and tuck to hide the cord ends.






When you're done, you can loop the end onto a keychain, knife, multi-tool, flashlight, etc...

I use the swivel clip to clip onto my belt loop and let the lanyard hang down inside my pocket.


Give it a try and have fun with it.

62 comments:

Chaz said...

cool!

Michael Langford said...

Very nice! I made one and the video was especially helpful. Thanks for the good info!

The Bigtyme said...

mine keeps coming up short at 10.5 I'm thinking trying it at 11.5.

Anonymous said...

Mine came up short at 10.5 as well. Went for 12 and a bit and had 6 inches either side, so 11.5 should be on the money. Thanks for the info though, very helpful.

cobra4246 said...

I made one of these. It took some doing but I got it. The videos and pics were very helpful
Thank you

sewiv said...

How is a video moving WAAAY too fast with no commentary labeled a "tutorial"?

Utterly useless, to me, at least.

Stormdrane said...

If it's too fast for you, try using the pause(II) button available on the video player.

There are several other online tutorials for the knot(a few of the other names it's known by: lanyard knot, boatswain's whistle knot, Chinese button knot, diamond knot, etc..) if you can't follow the video.

sewiv said...

My comment was meant more along the line of "That's not a tutorial, that's a show-off video."

It looks like you're basically saying "Look what I can do that you can't, and how fast I can do it! No, I'm not going to tell you what I'm doing, either".

The music just adds insult to injury.

Stormdrane said...

Some folks can learn visually by watching something being done and the video has helped many in that fashion. If it hasn't helped you, then that's too bad.

If you're actually interested in learning the knot, finding a solution to help you do that would be a better use of your time. The video is just 'my' version of showing how it's tied.

Below are a few other online learning resources for the 'lanyard knot', they may or may not be useful to you.

The lanyard knot is also called a diamond knot/boatswain's whistle knot/Chinese button knot/knife lanyard knot and there's probably a couple more names for it out there depending on the source.

sewiv said...

I found a tutorial on www.layhands.com which worked for me for the lanyard knot, and used your design.

Sorry I was so whiny earlier.

I used 12 feet of 500 cord (because that's what I had available). 5" gave me 13 cobra stitches. Came out reasonably well, for the first time doing anything like this.

Thanks for the design.

Stormdrane said...

No problem. :) It's kinda cool when you get the hang of a knot and can tie them from memory. But, it can also be frustrating when it seems you can't get it right after many attempts.

Having more than one source of instruction can help see a knot from different perspectives and has helped me with learning the ones I know. Patience can be the hardest part of learning some times.

Jack said...

Wow really very nice and good information you share here. I read your entire post and really superb information you share here on funny stuff. thanks for your information.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Stormdrane! Great job on the pictures and explanations. I'm going to end up with lanyards all over the place.

d.oberbanscheidt said...

Thanks a lot for this tutorial...

It shows everything you have to know for making a clean paracord lanyard.

Greetings from Germany

baz said...

It is very easy to make, for a new comer, because the authors explanation with pic, video and description. I do make lanyards and sell in ebay and I found this is very good products and I made first one and it is so good that no flaws at all.

Marcel | ausgeruestet.com said...

I like your Blog and tutorials, I'm every time impressed what creative work you do and what is possible with some simple cord...Myself is only able to do some simple knots, but you encourage me to try to write some paracord tips and tutorials in my own german equipment and edc Blog, too. Maybe you like it: http://www.ausgeruestet.com/search/label/Paracord

Lina said...

Ooo! love this. Thanks. Wondering what to make for the fellas and this is it. Sweet

Jill said...

Just finished my first P.L.P.... not bad for the first one. Thanks for the tutorials/step-by-steps!

Mine came up a bit short, too, but I suspect it has to do with my "light-handedness"... I didn't tighten each stitch very tight. Will try again and see what happens.

Thanks, again!

ultrahua said...

Thank for a good info.i finish one

JS said...

So how do you unite it?

Stormdrane said...

If you melted the ends, a pen tip can be used to break the connection, then the knots can be pulled apart.

If you tucked the ends, they have to be pulled back out to untie the lanyard.

If the ends were sewn in place, the thread can be carefully cut to untie the lanyard.

If super glue was used, whether or not you can get the end apart depends on how much glue you used. It only takes a tiny drop to secure the cord ends, and the ends can be worked apart with a pen like the melted finish. If a lot of glue was used, you may have to carefully cut away the glued section with a knife or scissors.

I prefer the tucking method to finish, using hemostats. Melting is also ok and the fastest finish when making the lanyards. It takes a little practice to melt the cord just right, a torch lighter works best, or you can end up with a messy finish and won't be able to get the lanyard apart easily.

Avocet Jules said...

Thank you for this - I am very impressed with the ones I have made. I haven't quite mastered the lanyard knot so have just done a simple knot at the end to make it into a loop. That still work well! Looking forward to completing more of your projects.

wanda art. said...

Beautiful , Ilove it.

shapewear said...

very beautiful. I followed your instructions step by step but I cant seem to get it to look as good as yours.

Stormdrane said...

It just takes practice to get better at knot tying. You can untie and retie until you get it where you're satisfied with the results. :)

Anonymous said...

Where would I be able to find a clip like the gray one at the bottom with the extra attached keyring?
Thanks!

Stormdrane said...

The snap hooks, swivel clips, and snap shackle, shown used with the lanyards for this project, are linked in this blog's links list, upper right side of the blog. ;)

Cassi said...

so hard to do the knot but i googled a diff video and came across this one thought u might want to use it instead so much easier to understand how to do it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WyScVv799k&feature=player_embedded but other than the video i love how it turned out im making them for christmas preents! thanks!

Anonymous said...

Very, very good tutorial/s.
One question though; where did you find that great snap shackle shown here Snap Shackle

Thanks again
Gordy

Stormdrane said...

@Gordy, That snap shackle came from milspecmonkey.com. The link is also on the blog page's links list, in the sidebar.

chris said...

Just wanted to say thanks for putting together a great blog and tutorial. I check back with your blog all the time for ideas and new stuff to try. Looked at a lot of different sites and yours is by far one of the best. Thanks Again!

Anonymous said...

where can i find the watch faces? do you just get regular watches and remove the band?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, When making paracord watchbands, I just use watches that I already have, removing/replacing the existing watchband that came with the watch.

babybluesedan said...

to the point and creative! thanks!

Anonymous said...

How much paracord did you need to make your mini key chain?

Anonymous said...

Also do you have a tutorial on how to make a neck paracord lanyard for keys?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I don't have a start to finish tutorial like this one for a neck lanyard, but I have made blog posts on different types of neck lanyards with info on them.

Not sure which 'mini key chain' is being referred to, but amounts needed vary, so always use more than you think you'll need, since it's better to have too much, than come up short when making something.

capnklump said...

Storm, is the "King" Cobra stitch named that simply because its tied over the Cobra stitch??

Stormdrane said...

@capnklump, The 'cobra stitch' and 'king cobra stitch' names for the same knots known as the Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet/square knotting, come from the boondoggleman.com website project for the 'cobra bracelet'. So anytime you see that 'cobra' name used for a knotted item, whether it's made from paracord, gimp strap, or other type of cordage, that's where that particular name originated.

Such projects made with gimp strapping have been sold through magazines and taught at summer camps to kids since back in the 1940's and '50s. I doubt many that have tied paracord bracelets or lanyards know that, but I'm sure they prefer that name to calling it scoubidou or macramae, lol... ;)

*Note that the actual knots used are ancient and have most likely been around longer than can be documented.

Maclaren said...

Looks really good and strong - may have a go at that when I get some time.

Anonymous said...

Do you take orders? I'd love to have a few items special made.

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I rarely take orders to keep from getting burned out on my hobby. I encourage folks to get some cord and give knot work a try themselves. ;)

Anonymous said...

@Stormdrane: thanks for the prompt reply. am currently in the jungles of sumatra and unable to find paracord. the keychain lanyard i've had for 15+ years is on its last string. was hoping you could help. please advise!

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, There are some folks that do custom requests for paracord work on some online forums, ebay, and etsy, but finding one that will ship to Sumatra/Indonesia will probably take a bit of searching.

The last time I shipped a paracord work to that part of the world, several years ago, it cost me more to make and ship the item than I had asked for it, and even though it made it to the person it was sent to, I never received payment for it. So, with experiences like that, it keeps folks from wanting to risk mailing things outside the U.S., but if you ask around enough, you may find someone to help out.

Anonymous said...

@Stormdrane: i'll gladly prepay and give you a US shipping address. i frequently get care packages from friends and family.

sorry if i'm coming across as desperate however, i've found several sites online and sent many messages already and thus far you are the only one who's replied.

i'd love to have a new keychain lanyard to replace the one i have that's falling apart. please advise if we can work out an agreement.

thx!!!

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, I don't keep a large supply of cord or accessories on hand to do requests, so if I tie something for someone, I have to work with what I have.

Jorge Kleiss said...

man your awesome, ive been making bracelets and anything that involves knots and i love it, i fix anything with knots and when i need something like a key-chain, lanyards, flashlights holders or anything with para-cord i make it myself, i make items for law enforcement, specifically a friend of mine and his boddy's from the swat team and the K9. made several short leashes, key chain-lanyards with a buckle release for their car keys and handcuff keys. woul;d love to share some of my creating with you.

Andrew said...

Great stuff. Thanks for all yr efforts!

Afraid Knots said...

These are some of my favorite things to make... no worries about sizes; just awesome care free knotting!

Thanks!


Kendall
Afraid Knots!

Phil said...

Just made 6 of these for Christmas gifts. Great work. Keep it up.

Gabo said...

Hey! Made one myself and it's great! Thanks a lot for posting this.

Anonymous said...

What is the name of the song in your video and who plays it??

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, Not sure which video you're referring to, but I use YouTube's AudioSwap for the one's with music, and some they provide the info on, usually shown under the video, and others they do not...

Jason Henderson said...

loving the tutorial and so easy to follow so thank you for that.
just have one question

i would like to make a twin colour one to hand out as prizes to my cubs and wonder if you have the lengths of paracord used in each layer rather than using one 10 foot length.

Stormdrane said...

@Jason, I haven't kept track of what the exact measurements would be, for a two color version with the outer layer being a different color than the first tied section, or if the two colors were attached after the loop and lanyard knot were tied so that both the inner and outer layer were two colors.

The second possible method mentioned would probably be something like one length being about 6.5 ft long and the shorter being 4.5 ft(always add in a little extra to be safe), with the connected section being knotted over by the first set of knots... Hope that helps.

Jason Henderson said...

2 * 42" will give you a 9" dual colour paracord lanyard. will send you a picture if i can figure out how to. not up on these blogging sites.

my lanyard knot is not perfect but it still looks great

Anonymous said...

i dont want to sound like an idiot but, what exactly does this rope chain thing do or help with?

Stormdrane said...

@Anonymous, It's first and foremost a LANYARD, which is used to help retain items that the user doesn't want to lose.

It's tied with 10 feet of paracord, which can be untied if necessary for a knowledgeable person to use for other tasks.

It's a knotted piece of gear that can be decorative and useful at the same time.

Billey Golden said...

I wonder if you think you can take a 12 inch braided Paracord and braid over a couple of time would it be almost as stiff as a 12 inch stick. interesting idea for a pare of Nun-chucks?????

Scott Manning said...

Thanks for taking the time to document that. Just made one now - very happy.

Cheers
Scott

Cherry Janice said...

can you recommend a cobra stitch tutorial

Stormdrane said...

Try my instructable for tying a paracord bracelet, using the cobra stitch, also known as a Solomon bar/Portuguese sinnet/square knotting/macrame knot.